Horror Movie Review: Baby Oopsie (2021)

Full Moon Pictures have had a few successful franchises over their existence. Many of which, we’ve covered in depth. Franchises like Puppet Master and Evil Bong. One franchise we’ve not given a lot of time too, is the Demonic Toys series of films. A series that centres on a collection of toys that are actually avatars of powerful demons from Hell.

The first film in the Demonic Toys series was released in 1992. Followed up by 1993’s crossover movie, Dollman vs. Demonic Toys before 2004 saw another crossover movie called Puppet Master vs Demonic Toys released. Lastly, the franchise finally got an official sequel in 2010 called Demonic Toys 2.

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Why all this talk of Demonic Toys? Simply because the titular villain of this new film, Baby Oopsie Daisy is one of the Demonic Toys. Yes, this is a spin-off of that franchise and maybe, something of a rebirth.

Written and directed by William Butler, Sybil Pittman (Libbie Higgins) is a sad human being. Living with an abusive stepmother, bullied by the locals, and treated poorly by her boss. Her only solace is her popular YouTube show where she collects and restores antique dolls.

One of her fans, an anonymous person, sends her a doll to restore. An ugly looking baby doll. It’s Baby Oopsie and once restored, it reveals its murderous tendencies. Something that could be to Sybil’s benefit, if she can just control it.

It’s not a particularly exciting story or even that unique. Yet, thanks to a strong cast and a strong sense of ‘off-beat humour’, Baby Oopsie is a fun watch.

A lot of that lands at the feet of the stars. Namely Sybil, who is a character you can have sympathy for and Baby Oopsie, whose foul moth rants are quite entertaining. The former, played wonderfully by Libbie Higgins, might be one hell of a caricature of the ‘put-upon’ loser but it’s so over the top, it’s downright entertaining. The same can be applied to a lot of the supporting cast who all have a ‘strangeness’ to them that makes them quite watchable.

The latter, while initially slow off the mark as it doesn’t get going until the second half of the movie, gives us the blood and gore we crave. Corny and silly kills but with some decent practical effects. The real entertainment comes from how Baby Oopsie goes from playful and cute to rampaging intensity in an instant.

It’s only around 70 minutes long, so doesn’t overstay its welcome and its off-beat style plays out, right up until the end. Full Moon might have something here, provided they don’t overdo it, as they often always do.




Baby Oopsie (2021)
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